Food Allergy Alert!

Mrs. Friend in the Nurse’s Office would like to remind students and parents to be aware of food allergies as you are out and about this holiday season.  For example, it has come to our attention that the Pheasant Lane Mall is cooking tree nuts. We want everybody to stay safe!

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NMS Fitness Challenge Starts Today!

NMS 100 Day Fitness Challenge

Day 1 – June 28 …… Day 100 – October 5, 2017

 

On day 1, do one of each exercise. On day 2, do two of each exercise.  On day 83, do eighty-three of each exercise.

With the exception of planks… do a 10 second plank for the first 10 days.  Then on day 11 add another second, so you will do an 11 second plank.  On day 83, you would do an eighty-three second plank.

 

You can break up the exercises throughout the day.  You don’t have to do all of them at once, you simply need to do all of them during the day. When you finish, color the corresponding square.  If you miss a day, leave it blank and start again the next day.

 

Challenge Awards for 75 days, 85 days, 95 days, and 100 days will be given at the first GREAT ASSEMBLY next fall. They will be given on your honor, if you lie – you’re just cheating yourself.

 

The Workout:

-Toe Touches… right hand touches left toe (like in PE warm-ups)

-Jumping jacks

-Squats

-Plank (follow the seconds rule above)

-High knees

-Lunges

-Sit-ups

-Push-ups (modified: on your knees or against the wall count… the goal is to challenge yourself)

 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90
91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

Any exercises you do in practices count. For example, if you do high knees at soccer practice, they count toward this challenge.

Join the fun! Get fit!

Outdoor Fun!

While our eighth graders were off in Washington DC, Ms. Stanton engaged our sixth graders in a game of Capture the Football! The 6 red team wore red and the 6 white team wore white. Both teams played hard! In the end, the score was tied 5-5. Thank you to Ms. Stanton and the sixth grade teachers for organizing this fun event!

 

 

 

Yoga Mats Wanted

Have an extra yoga mat hanging around? Ms. Stanton is excited to launch a new yoga unit. But, we need more yoga mats! Please donate a new or gently used yoga mat to our PE Program. Thanks!

Ice Cream for Sale!

Dear Parents,

We are pleased to announce that we will begin serving Rich’s Ice Cream in the middle school cafeterias beginning May 4.  The cost will be $1.00.

Rich’s ice cream novelties are designed specifically to meet the nutritional needs for schools, they meet the HHFKA requirements and are nut free.

Nutritional information can be found on Rich’s web site at www.richicecream.com.

We will be offering Low Fat Ice Cream Sandwiches, Fudge Frenzy Bars, Orange Cream Bar, Strawberry Shortcake, Chocolate Shortcake, and Creamy Cotton Candy.

Any questions can be directed to Michelle Curran, Whitsons  Food Service Director at curranms@whitsons.com.

 

Do vacations make you happier?

Welcome back! We hope you enjoyed your week off! Mrs. Gleason and I enjoy reading writing and research by Gretchen Rubin. Below is an article from Psychology Today that she posted that is fitting for today.

If you live in a cold climate, you know it’s the time of year when many people head for warmer locales. A week – or even less – in the sunshine can make you feel like a completely different person after months of freezing temperatures, snow and short days.

While a trip to the beach sure feels good, is there any evidence that vacationing is actually good for you?  We took a broad look at the research to find out if there are any data that demonstrate vacations reduce stress, improve well-being or yield other measurable positive effects.

The best evidence comes from a systematic review published in 2009 that looked at the benefits of taking a vacation. The review found that vacations have positive effects on healthand well-being, but that improvements fade several weeks after returning to work. The data raised more questions than they answered. Most of the subjects took their vacation in the summertime, not to escape cold weather. And little data was available on how vacationers spent their time. (Presumably, there is a difference between staying at home and traveling to a resort for your vacation.)  The review concluded that additional research on the effects of vacations is needed.

Since the 2009 review, some additional studies have found benefits of vacationing. One published by Finish researchers in 2010 found that vacations can generally improve health and well-being.  The study followed nearly 200 people who took winter sports vacations and long weekends away. Before, during and after the trips, the researchers measured six indicators: health status, mood, tension, energy level, fatigue and satisfaction. People in both groups – those who took weekend trips and longer vacations – reported higher levels of well-being during the vacation, but returned to their normal levels of well-being after the vacation.

Another single study, conducted by researchers in the Netherlands, measured the effects of vacations on happiness.  The study yielded similar results – that vacations do improve happiness, but those improvements fade within a few weeks. But it came to another surprising conclusion: the act of planning a vacation yields a much larger boost in happiness – up to eight additional weeks of improved moods in anticipating the vacation.

It turns out, how you spend your time on vacation is important too. A 2016 study published by the University of Massachusetts Amherst surveyed more than 800 vacationers to determine whether vacations relieve stress or improve life satisfaction. The study identified some attributes of vacations that lead to stress relief. People who perceive they have control over their travel plans are more likely to feel less stressed after a vacation. Mastering a new skill and detaching psychologically from work during a vacation also help to reduce stress levels. The study also found that longer vacations provide more opportunities to achieve these goals, hence yield greater benefits.

What do all these findings mean? The most likely scenario is that your vacation will improve your well-being for a short time, but not lead to any long-term changes in your mood or happiness. But anticipating a vacation will buy you extra weeks of an improved mood. And – depending on how you spend your time away (especially if your vacation is longer)  – you may see some long-term stress relief when you return.

CC0 Public Domain
Source: CC0 Public Domain

If you live in a cold climate, you know it’s the time of year when many people head for warmer locales. A week – or even less – in the sunshine can make you feel like a completely different person after months of freezing temperatures, snow and short days.

While a trip to the beach sure feels good, is there any evidence that vacationing is actually good for you?  We took a broad look at the research to find out if there are any data that demonstrate vacations reduce stress, improve well-being or yield other measurable positive effects.

The best evidence comes from a systematic review published in 2009 that looked at the benefits of taking a vacation. The review found that vacations have positive effects on healthand well-being, but that improvements fade several weeks after returning to work. The data raised more questions than they answered. Most of the subjects took their vacation in the summertime, not to escape cold weather. And little data was available on how vacationers spent their time. (Presumably, there is a difference between staying at home and traveling to a resort for your vacation.)  The review concluded that additional research on the effects of vacations is needed.

Since the 2009 review, some additional studies have found benefits of vacationing. One published by Finish researchers in 2010 found that vacations can generally improve health and well-being.  The study followed nearly 200 people who took winter sports vacations and long weekends away. Before, during and after the trips, the researchers measured six indicators: health status, mood, tension, energy level, fatigue and satisfaction. People in both groups – those who took weekend trips and longer vacations – reported higher levels of well-being during the vacation, but returned to their normal levels of well-being after the vacation.

Another single study, conducted by researchers in the Netherlands, measured the effects of vacations on happiness.  The study yielded similar results – that vacations do improve happiness, but those improvements fade within a few weeks. But it came to another surprising conclusion: the act of planning a vacation yields a much larger boost in happiness – up to eight additional weeks of improved moods in anticipating the vacation.

It turns out, how you spend your time on vacation is important too. A 2016 study published by the University of Massachusetts Amherst surveyed more than 800 vacationers to determine whether vacations relieve stress or improve life satisfaction. The study identified some attributes of vacations that lead to stress relief. People who perceive they have control over their travel plans are more likely to feel less stressed after a vacation. Mastering a new skill and detaching psychologically from work during a vacation also help to reduce stress levels. The study also found that longer vacations provide more opportunities to achieve these goals, hence yield greater benefits.

What do all these findings mean? The most likely scenario is that your vacation will improve your well-being for a short time, but not lead to any long-term changes in your mood or happiness. But anticipating a vacation will buy you extra weeks of an improved mood. And – depending on how you spend your time away (especially if your vacation is longer)  – you may see some long-term stress relief when you return.

References

Bloom, Jessica De, Michiel Kompier, Sabine Geurts, Carolina De Weerth, Toon Taris, and Sabine Sonnentag. “Do We Recover from Vacation? Meta-analysis of Vacation Effects on Health and Well-being.” Journal of Occupational Health 51.1 (2009): 13-25.

Chen, Chun-Chu, James F. Petrick, and Moji Shahvali. “Tourism Experiences as a Stress Reliever.” Journal of Travel Research 55.2 (2016): 150-60.

Basketball Shooting Challenge

Has your child shared anything with you about the basketball shooting challenge? This challenge is a part of the basketball unit in all grades.  The challenge is to make 5 consecutive baskets beginning in the paint and finishing with a 3 pointer.  Fifth and sith graders only need to make on three pointer, while seventh and eighth graders need to make two three point shots.

Thus far, only three students have successfully finished the challenge:  Jacob Howe in grade 8 was the first to finish.  Aidan Gallagher, a seventh grader completed the challenge as well as a 5th grader, David Brown.  David was thrilled to finish on his first try and equally excited that an 8th grade basketball team player, Jacob, would congratulate him and pose for a picture.  Jacob, excellent job showing kindness to David!

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